skyrover9:

mkaiser323:

It’s fun to chant “Bloody Mary” into your car’s side mirror three times and watch her jog and try to keep up.

Being a dick even to demons

(via uruvielnumenesse)

(Source: courageousdog, via fabrizee)

Tags: plot twist

Edmund Blair Leighton

(Source: majesticthorinss, via thranduiltheaccuser)

Tags: art

ytoob:

i was outside eating a cookie and a saw about 5 ants just roaming around on top of the steps and i noticed there was only one ant that wasn’t holding anything like the other 4 where holding dorito bits or something and the  ant seemed sad it wasn’t even going in the same pace as the other ants so i put a cookie crumb next to him and he picked it up and started running as fast as the other ants and i think i made that little ants day 

(Source: mnagos, via uruvielnumenesse)

thefunerarydirgeofaviolinist:

If I don’t reblog this just assume I died.

(Source: thranduilings, via shipperwolf1)

 
tastefullyoffensive:

"Get down, Mr. President!" [video]

tastefullyoffensive:

"Get down, Mr. President!" [video]

(Source: lawebloca, via onlysnakescanlove)

were-friends-now-that-ive:

linzeestyle:

scallawag:

image

RDJ, honey, the reason they don’t let you take props home is they’re worried you’d start wandering around in public wearing the Iron Man armor.

^Reblogging because that comment is absolutely true^

(Source: fluffalos, via reneausten)

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

(via reneausten)

chris-the-host:

florabon:

Tony + Beddazler = No good

I just spit out my tea…

(via uruvielnumenesse)

strawberrytop007:

datunofficialdisneyprincess:

upallnightogetloki:

oswaldz:

he did his makeup himself

Eyebrow game on POINT

Flawless

I can’t stop laughing HELP! XD

(via uruvielnumenesse)

"Insomniacs know better than anyone how it would be to haunt a house."

— Michael Cunningham (via roarofthemanticore)

(Source: amandaonwriting, via alaunas)

imsirius:

All of Stan Lee’s Marvel film cameos (updated!)

(via thranduiltheaccuser)